A place for fundamental (British) values in teacher education in Northern Ireland?

Alan McCully, Linda Clarke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper examines the distinctive locus of teacher education inNorthern Ireland (NI) in respect of Fundamental British Values (FBV).It is written from the perspective of teacher education tutors in aPGCE programme that explicitly subscribes to pursuing the SharedFuture agenda as outlined by NI Government policy in 2005. First, itestablishes the inappropriateness of pursuing an FBV agenda in NIwhere the historical and contemporary context has been characterisedby division expressed through opposing British and Irish identities;and, emerging from conflict where future political progress requiresgreater accommodation between these two often hostile positions.Second, using data from a previous Teaching and Learning ResearchProgramme study (2005) on Values in Teacher Education as anindicator of student teacher social and political attitudes, it draws onlater NI census (2011) and Life and Times Survey data (2005 and 2008)to identify the challenges and opportunities facing teacher educatorswishing to encourage a more nuanced awareness among studentteachers as to how identity issues impact on education. Finally, oneteacher education initiative designed for this purpose is examinedand its approaches offered as a means that Initial Teacher Educationmight contribute to producing teachers better equipped to contributeto a more accommodating society in NI in the future.Introduction
LanguageEnglish
Pages354-368
JournalJournal of Education for Teaching
Volume42
Issue number3
Early online date25 May 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2016

Fingerprint

teacher
Values
education
social attitude
teacher attitude
political attitude
tutor
accommodation
government policy
student teacher
Ireland
census
Teaching
learning

Keywords

  • Identity teacher education Northern Ireland fundamental British values

Cite this

@article{0d432ee4d36443bca71f1d8e202223d6,
title = "A place for fundamental (British) values in teacher education in Northern Ireland?",
abstract = "This paper examines the distinctive locus of teacher education inNorthern Ireland (NI) in respect of Fundamental British Values (FBV).It is written from the perspective of teacher education tutors in aPGCE programme that explicitly subscribes to pursuing the SharedFuture agenda as outlined by NI Government policy in 2005. First, itestablishes the inappropriateness of pursuing an FBV agenda in NIwhere the historical and contemporary context has been characterisedby division expressed through opposing British and Irish identities;and, emerging from conflict where future political progress requiresgreater accommodation between these two often hostile positions.Second, using data from a previous Teaching and Learning ResearchProgramme study (2005) on Values in Teacher Education as anindicator of student teacher social and political attitudes, it draws onlater NI census (2011) and Life and Times Survey data (2005 and 2008)to identify the challenges and opportunities facing teacher educatorswishing to encourage a more nuanced awareness among studentteachers as to how identity issues impact on education. Finally, oneteacher education initiative designed for this purpose is examinedand its approaches offered as a means that Initial Teacher Educationmight contribute to producing teachers better equipped to contributeto a more accommodating society in NI in the future.Introduction",
keywords = "Identity teacher education Northern Ireland fundamental British values",
author = "Alan McCully and Linda Clarke",
note = "Reference text: Akenson, D. H. 1973. Education and Enmity: The Control of Schooling in Northern Ireland, 1920–1950. Newton Abbot: David & Charles. Anderson, B. R. 1991. Imagined Communities: Reflections on the Origin and Spread of Nationalism. (Revised and extended ed.) London: Verso. Andrews, R., and A. Mycock. 2008. “Dilemmas of Devolution: The ‘Politics of Britishness’ and Citizenship Education.” British Politics 3: 139–155. Barton, K. C., and A. W. Mccully. 2005. “History, Identity, and the School Curriculum in Northern Ireland: An Empirical Study of Secondary Students’ Ideas and Perspectives.”Journal of Curriculum Studies, 37 (1): 85–116. Belfast (Good Friday) Agreement 1998. Accessed April 12, 2016. https://www.gov.uk/government/ publications/the-belfast-agreement Borooah, V., and C. Knox. 2015. The Economics of Schooling in a Divided Society. London: Palgrave Macmillan. Bush, K., and D. Saltarelli. 2000. The Two Faces of Education in Ethnic Conflict. Florence: Innocenti Research Centre. CCEA. 2007. The Northern Ireland Curriculum http://ccea.org.uk/curriculum Clarke, L., and G. Magennis. 2016. “Teacher Education in Northern Ireland, Imperatives, Initiatives and Influences.” In Teacher Education in times of Change, edited by Gary Beauchamp, Linda Clarke, Moira Hulme, Martin Jephcote, Aileen Kennedy, Geraldine Magennis, Ian Menter, Jean Murray, Trevor Mutton, Teresa O’Doherty, and Gillian Peiser, 75–90. Bristol: Policy Press. Crone, R., and J. Malone. 1983. The Human Curriculum. Belfast: Farset Co-operative Press. Davies, L. 2004. Education and Conflict: Complexity and Chaos. Oxford: Routledge. Deaux K. 1996. “Social Identification.” In Social Psychology: Handbook of Basic Principles, edited by E. Tory. Higgins and Arie W. Kruglanski, 777–798. New York: Guilford. Department for Education. 2014. Promoting Fundamental British Values as Part of SMSC in Schools: Departmental Advice for Maintained Schools. https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/ uploads/attachment_data/file/380595/SMSC_Guidance_Maintained_Schools.pdf. Dillon, M. 1991. The Dirty War. London: Arrow Books. ESPN. 2015. Olympic Choice Weighed Heavily on Rory McIlroy. Accessed November 20, 2015. http:// espn.go.com/golf/story/_/id/13360027/olympic-choice-weighed-heavily-rory-mcilroy Farren, S. 2012. Should We Ignore Our past? Reflections on the Development of Teacher Education in Ireland. GTCNI Annual Lecture, Belfast: GTCNI. Furey A., C. Donnelly, J. Hughes, and D. Blaylock. 2016. Interpretations of National Identity in Postconflict Northern Ireland: A Comparison of Different School Settings. Research Papers in Education. http://dx.doi.org.1080/02671522.2016.1158855. Gallagher, Tony. 2004. Education in Divided Societies. Basingstoke: Palgrave MacMillan. Gallagher C. 2006. “Education Matters: The Process of Educational Reform and the Creation of a More Pluralist Curriculum under Devolution.” Google Books.Com https://www.academia.edu/1556979/ Curriculum_matters_the_process_of_education_reform_and_the_creation_of_a_more_pluralist_ curriculum_under_devolution. Gallagher C. 2012. “Curriculum Past, Present and Future: A Study of the Development of the Northern Ireland Curriculum in a Wider UK and International Context.” PhD Thesis, Ulster University. Galtung, J. 1964. “An Editorial.” Journal of Peace Research 1 (1): 1–4. Garry, J., and K. McNicholl. 2015. Understanding ‘Northern Irish’ Identity, Briefing Paper, Knowledge Exchange Seminar Series (KESS), Belfast: Northern Ireland Assembly/QUB. General Teaching Council of Northern Ireland (GTCNI). 2011. Teaching: The Reflective Profession. Belfast: GTCNI. 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 AQ11 AQ12 CJET 1184465 5 May 2016 Initial CE: GI QA: PM Coll:XX QC:XX 14 A. McCully and L. Clarke Gray, A. M., and D. Birrell. 2014. “Welfare Reform and Devolution: Issues of Parity, Discretion and Divergence for the UK Government and the Devolved Administrations.” Public Money and Management 34 (3): 205–212. Hargie, O., D. Dickson, and S. Nelson. 2003. “A Lesson Too Late for the Learning? Cross Community Contact and Communication among University Students.” In Researching the Troubles: Social Science Perspectives of the Northern Ireland Conflict, edited by Owen Hargie and David Dickson, 85–106. Edinburgh: Mainstream Publishing. HM Government. 2011. Prevent Strategy. London: TSO. Hughes, J., and R. Loader. 2016. “‘Plugging the Gap’: Shared Education and the Promotion of Community Relations through Schools in Northern Ireland.” British Educational Research Journal 41 (6): 1125–1142. Knox, C. 2011. “Tackling Racism in Northern Ireland: ‘The Race Hate Capital of Europe’.” Journal of Social Policy 40 (02): 387–412. Lederach, J.-P. 1995. Preparing for Peace: Conflict Transformation across Cultures. Syracuse, NY: University Press. McAuley, J. W. 2016. Very British Rebels? The Culture and Politics of Ulster Loyalism, London: Bloomsbury. McCully, A. 2010. Better Embedding Community Relations Principles in Initial Teacher Education: Concluding Report to Funders. Coleraine: International Fund for Ireland/UNESCO Centre, University of Ulster. McCully A., and A. Montgomery. 2009. “Knowledge, Skills and Dispositions: Educating History Teachers in a Divided Society.” International Journal of Historical Learning, Teaching and Research 8 (2): 92–105. Accessed April 12, 2016. http://www.history.org.uk/resources/secondary_resource_2593_8.html Montgomery, A., and A. Smith. 1997. Values in Education in Northern Ireland. Belfast: Northern Ireland Council for the Curriculum and Assessment (CCEA). Moran, A. 2009. “Can a Competence or Standards Model Facilitate an Inclusive Approach to Teacher Education?” International Journal of Inclusive Education 13 (1): 45–61. Morrow D. 1996. “In Search of Common Ground.” In Northern Ireland Politics, edited by A. Aughey and D. Morrow, 56–64. London: Longman Muldoon, O., K. Trew, J. Todd, and Nathalie Rougier. 2007. “Religious and National Identity after the Belfast Good Friday Agreement.” Political Psychology 28 (1): 89–103. Murray, D. 1985. World’s Apart: Segregated Schools in Northern Ireland. Belfast: Appletree Press. Nolan P. 2013. Northern Ireland Peace Monitoring Report: Number 2, Belfast: Community Relations Council. Accessed December 3, 2015. http://cain.ulst.ac.uk/events/peace/docs/nipmr_2013-04_full. pdf Northern Ireland Life and Times Survey. 2005/2008. Accessed August 2013. http://www.ark.ac.uk/ nilt/2007/Identity/BRITPROT.html NISRA (Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency) 2013. Census 2011: Detailed Characteristics for Northern Ireland on Health, Religion and National Identity. http://www.nisra.gov.uk/Census/ detailedcharacteristics_stats_bulletin_2011.pdf. O’Dowd, L. 1998. “Constituting Division, Impending Agreement: The Neglected Role of British Nationalism in Northern Ireland.” In Dis/Agreeing Ireland: Context, Obstacles, Hopes, edited by J. Anderson and J. Goodman, 108–125. London: Pluto Press. OFM/DFM (Office of the First Minister and Deputy First Minister) 2005. Shared Future: Policy and Strategic Framework for Good Relations in Northern Ireland. Belfast: OFM/DFM. Accessed 23 August, 2013. http://www.ofmdfmni.gov.uk/asharedfuturepolicy2005.pdf Parekh, B. 2000. Rethinking Multiculturalism: Cultural Diversity and Political Theory. New York: Palgrave. Paulston, J., ed. 2011. Education and Reconciliation: Exploring Conflict and Post-conflict Situations. London: Continuum. Phillips, R. 2003. “Education Policy, Comprehensive Schooling and Devolution in the DisUnited Kingdom: An Historical ‘home International’ Analysis.” Journal of Education Policy 18 (1): 1–17. Richardson N. 2011a. “Education for Diversity and Mutual Understanding|: Context and Rationale”. In Education for Diversity and Mutual Understanding, edited by, N. Richardson and T. Gallagher, 23–61. Bern: Peter Lang. Richardson, N. 2011b. “Critiques and Objections.” In Education for Diversity and Mutual Understanding,",
year = "2016",
month = "7",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1080/02607476.2016.1184465",
language = "English",
volume = "42",
pages = "354--368",
journal = "Journal of Education for Teaching",
issn = "0260-7476",
number = "3",

}

A place for fundamental (British) values in teacher education in Northern Ireland? / McCully, Alan; Clarke, Linda.

In: Journal of Education for Teaching, Vol. 42, No. 3, 01.07.2016, p. 354-368.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - A place for fundamental (British) values in teacher education in Northern Ireland?

AU - McCully, Alan

AU - Clarke, Linda

N1 - Reference text: Akenson, D. H. 1973. Education and Enmity: The Control of Schooling in Northern Ireland, 1920–1950. Newton Abbot: David & Charles. Anderson, B. R. 1991. Imagined Communities: Reflections on the Origin and Spread of Nationalism. (Revised and extended ed.) London: Verso. Andrews, R., and A. Mycock. 2008. “Dilemmas of Devolution: The ‘Politics of Britishness’ and Citizenship Education.” British Politics 3: 139–155. Barton, K. C., and A. W. Mccully. 2005. “History, Identity, and the School Curriculum in Northern Ireland: An Empirical Study of Secondary Students’ Ideas and Perspectives.”Journal of Curriculum Studies, 37 (1): 85–116. Belfast (Good Friday) Agreement 1998. Accessed April 12, 2016. https://www.gov.uk/government/ publications/the-belfast-agreement Borooah, V., and C. Knox. 2015. The Economics of Schooling in a Divided Society. London: Palgrave Macmillan. Bush, K., and D. Saltarelli. 2000. The Two Faces of Education in Ethnic Conflict. Florence: Innocenti Research Centre. CCEA. 2007. The Northern Ireland Curriculum http://ccea.org.uk/curriculum Clarke, L., and G. Magennis. 2016. “Teacher Education in Northern Ireland, Imperatives, Initiatives and Influences.” In Teacher Education in times of Change, edited by Gary Beauchamp, Linda Clarke, Moira Hulme, Martin Jephcote, Aileen Kennedy, Geraldine Magennis, Ian Menter, Jean Murray, Trevor Mutton, Teresa O’Doherty, and Gillian Peiser, 75–90. Bristol: Policy Press. Crone, R., and J. Malone. 1983. The Human Curriculum. Belfast: Farset Co-operative Press. Davies, L. 2004. Education and Conflict: Complexity and Chaos. Oxford: Routledge. Deaux K. 1996. “Social Identification.” In Social Psychology: Handbook of Basic Principles, edited by E. Tory. Higgins and Arie W. Kruglanski, 777–798. New York: Guilford. Department for Education. 2014. Promoting Fundamental British Values as Part of SMSC in Schools: Departmental Advice for Maintained Schools. https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/ uploads/attachment_data/file/380595/SMSC_Guidance_Maintained_Schools.pdf. Dillon, M. 1991. The Dirty War. London: Arrow Books. ESPN. 2015. Olympic Choice Weighed Heavily on Rory McIlroy. Accessed November 20, 2015. http:// espn.go.com/golf/story/_/id/13360027/olympic-choice-weighed-heavily-rory-mcilroy Farren, S. 2012. Should We Ignore Our past? Reflections on the Development of Teacher Education in Ireland. GTCNI Annual Lecture, Belfast: GTCNI. Furey A., C. Donnelly, J. Hughes, and D. Blaylock. 2016. Interpretations of National Identity in Postconflict Northern Ireland: A Comparison of Different School Settings. Research Papers in Education. http://dx.doi.org.1080/02671522.2016.1158855. Gallagher, Tony. 2004. Education in Divided Societies. Basingstoke: Palgrave MacMillan. Gallagher C. 2006. “Education Matters: The Process of Educational Reform and the Creation of a More Pluralist Curriculum under Devolution.” Google Books.Com https://www.academia.edu/1556979/ Curriculum_matters_the_process_of_education_reform_and_the_creation_of_a_more_pluralist_ curriculum_under_devolution. Gallagher C. 2012. “Curriculum Past, Present and Future: A Study of the Development of the Northern Ireland Curriculum in a Wider UK and International Context.” PhD Thesis, Ulster University. Galtung, J. 1964. “An Editorial.” Journal of Peace Research 1 (1): 1–4. Garry, J., and K. McNicholl. 2015. Understanding ‘Northern Irish’ Identity, Briefing Paper, Knowledge Exchange Seminar Series (KESS), Belfast: Northern Ireland Assembly/QUB. General Teaching Council of Northern Ireland (GTCNI). 2011. Teaching: The Reflective Profession. Belfast: GTCNI. 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 AQ11 AQ12 CJET 1184465 5 May 2016 Initial CE: GI QA: PM Coll:XX QC:XX 14 A. McCully and L. Clarke Gray, A. M., and D. Birrell. 2014. “Welfare Reform and Devolution: Issues of Parity, Discretion and Divergence for the UK Government and the Devolved Administrations.” Public Money and Management 34 (3): 205–212. Hargie, O., D. Dickson, and S. Nelson. 2003. “A Lesson Too Late for the Learning? Cross Community Contact and Communication among University Students.” In Researching the Troubles: Social Science Perspectives of the Northern Ireland Conflict, edited by Owen Hargie and David Dickson, 85–106. Edinburgh: Mainstream Publishing. HM Government. 2011. Prevent Strategy. London: TSO. Hughes, J., and R. Loader. 2016. “‘Plugging the Gap’: Shared Education and the Promotion of Community Relations through Schools in Northern Ireland.” British Educational Research Journal 41 (6): 1125–1142. Knox, C. 2011. “Tackling Racism in Northern Ireland: ‘The Race Hate Capital of Europe’.” Journal of Social Policy 40 (02): 387–412. Lederach, J.-P. 1995. Preparing for Peace: Conflict Transformation across Cultures. Syracuse, NY: University Press. McAuley, J. W. 2016. Very British Rebels? The Culture and Politics of Ulster Loyalism, London: Bloomsbury. McCully, A. 2010. Better Embedding Community Relations Principles in Initial Teacher Education: Concluding Report to Funders. Coleraine: International Fund for Ireland/UNESCO Centre, University of Ulster. McCully A., and A. Montgomery. 2009. “Knowledge, Skills and Dispositions: Educating History Teachers in a Divided Society.” International Journal of Historical Learning, Teaching and Research 8 (2): 92–105. Accessed April 12, 2016. http://www.history.org.uk/resources/secondary_resource_2593_8.html Montgomery, A., and A. Smith. 1997. Values in Education in Northern Ireland. Belfast: Northern Ireland Council for the Curriculum and Assessment (CCEA). Moran, A. 2009. “Can a Competence or Standards Model Facilitate an Inclusive Approach to Teacher Education?” International Journal of Inclusive Education 13 (1): 45–61. Morrow D. 1996. “In Search of Common Ground.” In Northern Ireland Politics, edited by A. Aughey and D. Morrow, 56–64. London: Longman Muldoon, O., K. Trew, J. Todd, and Nathalie Rougier. 2007. “Religious and National Identity after the Belfast Good Friday Agreement.” Political Psychology 28 (1): 89–103. Murray, D. 1985. World’s Apart: Segregated Schools in Northern Ireland. Belfast: Appletree Press. Nolan P. 2013. Northern Ireland Peace Monitoring Report: Number 2, Belfast: Community Relations Council. Accessed December 3, 2015. http://cain.ulst.ac.uk/events/peace/docs/nipmr_2013-04_full. pdf Northern Ireland Life and Times Survey. 2005/2008. Accessed August 2013. http://www.ark.ac.uk/ nilt/2007/Identity/BRITPROT.html NISRA (Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency) 2013. Census 2011: Detailed Characteristics for Northern Ireland on Health, Religion and National Identity. http://www.nisra.gov.uk/Census/ detailedcharacteristics_stats_bulletin_2011.pdf. O’Dowd, L. 1998. “Constituting Division, Impending Agreement: The Neglected Role of British Nationalism in Northern Ireland.” In Dis/Agreeing Ireland: Context, Obstacles, Hopes, edited by J. Anderson and J. Goodman, 108–125. London: Pluto Press. OFM/DFM (Office of the First Minister and Deputy First Minister) 2005. Shared Future: Policy and Strategic Framework for Good Relations in Northern Ireland. Belfast: OFM/DFM. Accessed 23 August, 2013. http://www.ofmdfmni.gov.uk/asharedfuturepolicy2005.pdf Parekh, B. 2000. Rethinking Multiculturalism: Cultural Diversity and Political Theory. New York: Palgrave. Paulston, J., ed. 2011. Education and Reconciliation: Exploring Conflict and Post-conflict Situations. London: Continuum. Phillips, R. 2003. “Education Policy, Comprehensive Schooling and Devolution in the DisUnited Kingdom: An Historical ‘home International’ Analysis.” Journal of Education Policy 18 (1): 1–17. Richardson N. 2011a. “Education for Diversity and Mutual Understanding|: Context and Rationale”. In Education for Diversity and Mutual Understanding, edited by, N. Richardson and T. Gallagher, 23–61. Bern: Peter Lang. Richardson, N. 2011b. “Critiques and Objections.” In Education for Diversity and Mutual Understanding,

PY - 2016/7/1

Y1 - 2016/7/1

N2 - This paper examines the distinctive locus of teacher education inNorthern Ireland (NI) in respect of Fundamental British Values (FBV).It is written from the perspective of teacher education tutors in aPGCE programme that explicitly subscribes to pursuing the SharedFuture agenda as outlined by NI Government policy in 2005. First, itestablishes the inappropriateness of pursuing an FBV agenda in NIwhere the historical and contemporary context has been characterisedby division expressed through opposing British and Irish identities;and, emerging from conflict where future political progress requiresgreater accommodation between these two often hostile positions.Second, using data from a previous Teaching and Learning ResearchProgramme study (2005) on Values in Teacher Education as anindicator of student teacher social and political attitudes, it draws onlater NI census (2011) and Life and Times Survey data (2005 and 2008)to identify the challenges and opportunities facing teacher educatorswishing to encourage a more nuanced awareness among studentteachers as to how identity issues impact on education. Finally, oneteacher education initiative designed for this purpose is examinedand its approaches offered as a means that Initial Teacher Educationmight contribute to producing teachers better equipped to contributeto a more accommodating society in NI in the future.Introduction

AB - This paper examines the distinctive locus of teacher education inNorthern Ireland (NI) in respect of Fundamental British Values (FBV).It is written from the perspective of teacher education tutors in aPGCE programme that explicitly subscribes to pursuing the SharedFuture agenda as outlined by NI Government policy in 2005. First, itestablishes the inappropriateness of pursuing an FBV agenda in NIwhere the historical and contemporary context has been characterisedby division expressed through opposing British and Irish identities;and, emerging from conflict where future political progress requiresgreater accommodation between these two often hostile positions.Second, using data from a previous Teaching and Learning ResearchProgramme study (2005) on Values in Teacher Education as anindicator of student teacher social and political attitudes, it draws onlater NI census (2011) and Life and Times Survey data (2005 and 2008)to identify the challenges and opportunities facing teacher educatorswishing to encourage a more nuanced awareness among studentteachers as to how identity issues impact on education. Finally, oneteacher education initiative designed for this purpose is examinedand its approaches offered as a means that Initial Teacher Educationmight contribute to producing teachers better equipped to contributeto a more accommodating society in NI in the future.Introduction

KW - Identity teacher education Northern Ireland fundamental British values

U2 - 10.1080/02607476.2016.1184465

DO - 10.1080/02607476.2016.1184465

M3 - Article

VL - 42

SP - 354

EP - 368

JO - Journal of Education for Teaching

T2 - Journal of Education for Teaching

JF - Journal of Education for Teaching

SN - 0260-7476

IS - 3

ER -