'A Mysterious Discrimination': Irish Medical Emigration to the United States in the 1950s

Greta Jones

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, Ireland exported a considerablenumber of her medical graduates, mainly to Britain and the British Empire. After the SecondWorld War there was a shift. The 1950s and 1960s saw an increase in the emigration of doctors to North America. The American Medical Association, worried about the possible impact upon the profession, introduced in 1950 a list of foreign medical schools which, in their view, met American standards of medical education. The failure of Irish medical schools to make this approved list brought to the surface problems in Irish medical education. This episode illustrates a number of issues raised by medical migration; recognition of qualifications and equivalency across borders; the rise of the USA as a global medical hegemonic power; the involvement of national governments; and migration as a catalyst for change in the exporting country.
    LanguageEnglish
    Pages139-156
    JournalSocial History of Medicine
    Volume25
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2011

    Fingerprint

    1950s
    Emigration
    Discrimination
    Medical School
    Medical Education
    1960s
    Ireland
    Rise
    American Medical Association
    Doctors
    Equivalency
    Government
    Qualification
    British Empire

    Keywords

    • American Medical Association
    • General Medical Council
    • National University of Ireland
    • licensure
    • migration

    Cite this

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    abstract = "Throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, Ireland exported a considerablenumber of her medical graduates, mainly to Britain and the British Empire. After the SecondWorld War there was a shift. The 1950s and 1960s saw an increase in the emigration of doctors to North America. The American Medical Association, worried about the possible impact upon the profession, introduced in 1950 a list of foreign medical schools which, in their view, met American standards of medical education. The failure of Irish medical schools to make this approved list brought to the surface problems in Irish medical education. This episode illustrates a number of issues raised by medical migration; recognition of qualifications and equivalency across borders; the rise of the USA as a global medical hegemonic power; the involvement of national governments; and migration as a catalyst for change in the exporting country.",
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    'A Mysterious Discrimination': Irish Medical Emigration to the United States in the 1950s. / Jones, Greta.

    In: Social History of Medicine, Vol. 25, No. 1, 2011, p. 139-156.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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