A log-on a day keeps the doctor away - Communication and language factors influencing social media use for health interactions

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Background: Social media is increasingly used for health interactions. Whilst valuable information is being gathered on the motivators for using online resources within healthcare, there has been less propensity to take a step further back to understand the fundamental sources that fuel these behaviours. The aim of this study was to determine communication and language factors influencing social media for health interactions to provide recommendations for healthcare providers using social media among the general public.Methods: This was a quantitative survey (online and hard copy), and utilises Social Cognitive Theory as a framework wherein to explore individuals use of social media for health interaction. Members of the general public (n=400) participated in this survey, who were recruited from various organisations. The inclusion criteria were: members of the general public; aged 18-65 years; and self-reporting in general good health. An exclusion criterion was individuals who had been diagnosed with a chronic condition within six months prior to research participation. Data was analysed using SPSS (version 21). Ethical approval was obtained.Findings: This survey identified seven communication and language factors influencing the use of social media for health interactions as: widening access; supplementing information from a health professional; clarifying information from a health professional; trust; reliability; format of the content; and medical jargon, which were applied to the Social Cognitive Theory.Discussion: This survey concludes that it is important for healthcare providers to recognise and maximise the potential benefits of social media as an important tool for enhancing health literacy by ensuring that information is accurate, updated, sensitively worded, consistent and in a language that its users can navigate and interpret, to enhance self-efficacy and thus health outcomes among a wide range of the population. Eight recommendations were provided for healthcare providers using social media among the general public to enhance health outcomes.
LanguageEnglish
Title of host publicationUnknown Host Publication
Number of pages1
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 6 Jun 2016
EventInternational Conference on Communication in Healthcare - Heidelberg, Germany
Duration: 6 Jun 2016 → …

Conference

ConferenceInternational Conference on Communication in Healthcare
Period6/06/16 → …

Fingerprint

Social Media
Language
Communication
Health
Health Personnel
Health Literacy
Self Efficacy
Delivery of Health Care

Keywords

  • Communication
  • language
  • social media
  • health interactions
  • adults

Cite this

@inproceedings{f04dcd5c3c2e461884b93c403720fa65,
title = "A log-on a day keeps the doctor away - Communication and language factors influencing social media use for health interactions",
abstract = "Background: Social media is increasingly used for health interactions. Whilst valuable information is being gathered on the motivators for using online resources within healthcare, there has been less propensity to take a step further back to understand the fundamental sources that fuel these behaviours. The aim of this study was to determine communication and language factors influencing social media for health interactions to provide recommendations for healthcare providers using social media among the general public.Methods: This was a quantitative survey (online and hard copy), and utilises Social Cognitive Theory as a framework wherein to explore individuals use of social media for health interaction. Members of the general public (n=400) participated in this survey, who were recruited from various organisations. The inclusion criteria were: members of the general public; aged 18-65 years; and self-reporting in general good health. An exclusion criterion was individuals who had been diagnosed with a chronic condition within six months prior to research participation. Data was analysed using SPSS (version 21). Ethical approval was obtained.Findings: This survey identified seven communication and language factors influencing the use of social media for health interactions as: widening access; supplementing information from a health professional; clarifying information from a health professional; trust; reliability; format of the content; and medical jargon, which were applied to the Social Cognitive Theory.Discussion: This survey concludes that it is important for healthcare providers to recognise and maximise the potential benefits of social media as an important tool for enhancing health literacy by ensuring that information is accurate, updated, sensitively worded, consistent and in a language that its users can navigate and interpret, to enhance self-efficacy and thus health outcomes among a wide range of the population. Eight recommendations were provided for healthcare providers using social media among the general public to enhance health outcomes.",
keywords = "Communication, language, social media, health interactions, adults",
author = "Anne Moorhead and Maggie Long and Jill Hendron",
year = "2016",
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booktitle = "Unknown Host Publication",

}

A log-on a day keeps the doctor away - Communication and language factors influencing social media use for health interactions. / Moorhead, Anne; Long, Maggie; Hendron, Jill.

Unknown Host Publication. 2016.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

TY - GEN

T1 - A log-on a day keeps the doctor away - Communication and language factors influencing social media use for health interactions

AU - Moorhead, Anne

AU - Long, Maggie

AU - Hendron, Jill

PY - 2016/6/6

Y1 - 2016/6/6

N2 - Background: Social media is increasingly used for health interactions. Whilst valuable information is being gathered on the motivators for using online resources within healthcare, there has been less propensity to take a step further back to understand the fundamental sources that fuel these behaviours. The aim of this study was to determine communication and language factors influencing social media for health interactions to provide recommendations for healthcare providers using social media among the general public.Methods: This was a quantitative survey (online and hard copy), and utilises Social Cognitive Theory as a framework wherein to explore individuals use of social media for health interaction. Members of the general public (n=400) participated in this survey, who were recruited from various organisations. The inclusion criteria were: members of the general public; aged 18-65 years; and self-reporting in general good health. An exclusion criterion was individuals who had been diagnosed with a chronic condition within six months prior to research participation. Data was analysed using SPSS (version 21). Ethical approval was obtained.Findings: This survey identified seven communication and language factors influencing the use of social media for health interactions as: widening access; supplementing information from a health professional; clarifying information from a health professional; trust; reliability; format of the content; and medical jargon, which were applied to the Social Cognitive Theory.Discussion: This survey concludes that it is important for healthcare providers to recognise and maximise the potential benefits of social media as an important tool for enhancing health literacy by ensuring that information is accurate, updated, sensitively worded, consistent and in a language that its users can navigate and interpret, to enhance self-efficacy and thus health outcomes among a wide range of the population. Eight recommendations were provided for healthcare providers using social media among the general public to enhance health outcomes.

AB - Background: Social media is increasingly used for health interactions. Whilst valuable information is being gathered on the motivators for using online resources within healthcare, there has been less propensity to take a step further back to understand the fundamental sources that fuel these behaviours. The aim of this study was to determine communication and language factors influencing social media for health interactions to provide recommendations for healthcare providers using social media among the general public.Methods: This was a quantitative survey (online and hard copy), and utilises Social Cognitive Theory as a framework wherein to explore individuals use of social media for health interaction. Members of the general public (n=400) participated in this survey, who were recruited from various organisations. The inclusion criteria were: members of the general public; aged 18-65 years; and self-reporting in general good health. An exclusion criterion was individuals who had been diagnosed with a chronic condition within six months prior to research participation. Data was analysed using SPSS (version 21). Ethical approval was obtained.Findings: This survey identified seven communication and language factors influencing the use of social media for health interactions as: widening access; supplementing information from a health professional; clarifying information from a health professional; trust; reliability; format of the content; and medical jargon, which were applied to the Social Cognitive Theory.Discussion: This survey concludes that it is important for healthcare providers to recognise and maximise the potential benefits of social media as an important tool for enhancing health literacy by ensuring that information is accurate, updated, sensitively worded, consistent and in a language that its users can navigate and interpret, to enhance self-efficacy and thus health outcomes among a wide range of the population. Eight recommendations were provided for healthcare providers using social media among the general public to enhance health outcomes.

KW - Communication

KW - language

KW - social media

KW - health interactions

KW - adults

M3 - Conference contribution

BT - Unknown Host Publication

ER -