A cross-sectional examination of the mental wellbeing, coping and quality of working life in health and social care workers in the UK at two time points of the COVID-19 pandemic

Paula Mc Fadden, Ruth Neill, John Moriarty, Patricia Gillen, John Mallett, Jill Manthorpe, Denise Currie, Heike Schroder, Jermaine Ravalier, Patricia Nicholl, Daniel McFadden, Jana Ross

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Abstract

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to evolve around the world, it is important to examine its effect on societies and individuals, including health and social care (HSC) professionals. The aim of this study was to compare cross-sectional data collected from HSC staff in the UK at two time points during the COVID-19 pandemic; Phase 1 (May–July 2020) and Phase 2 (November 2020–January 2021). The HSC staff surveyed consisted of nurses, midwives, allied health profession-als, social care workers and social workers from across the UK (England, Wales, Scotland, Northern Ireland). Multiple regressions were used to examine the effects of different coping strategies and demographic and work-related variables on participants’ wellbeing and quality of working life to see how and if the predictors changed over time. An additional multiple regression was used to directly examine the effects of time (Phase 1 vs. Phase 2) on the outcome variables. Findings suggested that both wellbeing and quality of working life deteriorated from Phase 1 to Phase 2. The results have the potential to inform interventions for HSC staff during future waves of the COVID-19 pandemic, other infectious outbreaks or even other circumstances putting long-term pressures on HSC systems.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)227-241
Number of pages14
JournalEpidemiology
Volume2
Issue number3
Early online date22 Jun 2021
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 22 Jun 2021

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