Photo of Art Hughes
  • York Street, Belfast Campus

    BT15 1ED Belfast

    United Kingdom

  • 0 Citations
  • 0 h-Index
20102016
If you made any changes in Pure these will be visible here soon.

Personal profile

Biography

Dr Art Hughes is Reader in Irish. In 2009-2010, he was Visiting Professor and Senior Fulbright Scholar, Ireland House, at New York University.In 1999, he was appointed Lecturer in Irish language and Literature at Ulster University. He was Lecturer in Institute of Irish Studies Queen's University Belfast and Armagh in 1995-98.He is also chair of the McCracken Cultural Society, Belfast and contributor on a sporadic basis to radio and television programmes on Irish-language related topics.Research FieldsOld Irish to modern pan-Gaelic dialects; phonetics, Old, Early Modern and Modern Gaelic literature.

Fingerprint Fingerprint is based on mining the text of the person's scientific documents to create an index of weighted terms, which defines the key subjects of each individual researcher.

  • 5 Similar Profiles
language Social Sciences
Irish Language Arts & Humanities
Ireland Arts & Humanities
Belfast Arts & Humanities
Poem Arts & Humanities
Continental Arts & Humanities
Lecturers Arts & Humanities
Lenition Arts & Humanities

Network Recent external collaboration on country level. Dive into details by clicking on the dots.

Research Output 2010 2016

Basic Irish Conversation and Grammar (Bunchomhrá Gaeilge agus Gramadach)

Hughes, A. J., 2016, Belfast. 224 p.

Research output: Book/ReportBook

‘Greek stegos “roof”, Old Irish teg, Clare Irish [tʹe’] “house”: a stratified reappraisal of “house” in pan-Gaelic’

Hughes, A. J., 2015, Mélanges en l'honneur de Pierre-Yves Lambert. Bretagne, p. 139-183

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Late Old Irish lenition and the modern Gaelic Verb

Hughes, A. J., 6 Nov 2013, Berlin: Curach Bhán Publications.

Research output: Book/ReportBook

Particle
Verbs
Lenition
Scotland
Modern Era

‘On Substantiating Indo-European *wlkos 'wolf' in Celtic, Continental and Insular’

Hughes, A., 19 Sep 2012, 39, p. 163-174

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

language
Continental
Borrowing
Indo-European Languages
Taboo