Description

Engineers conducting experiments in the unique environment of microgravity – known as Zero-G – have gained important new insights into the way metals solidify. Data from experiments installed on rockets that travelled some 260km above Earth helped develop a new method for assessing how solidification takes place – and that will allow for the production of stronger metal components. The global market for AM products and services in 2015 was £3.59bn and has grown at a rate of 31.5 per cent annually.

Subject

Microgravity research into Materials

Period20 Mar 2018

Media coverage

1

Media coverage

  • TitleMicrogravity Research
    Degree of recognitionNational
    Media name/outletEngineers Journal
    Media typeWeb
    CountryUnited Kingdom
    Date20/03/18
    DescriptionEngineers conducting experiments in the unique environment of microgravity – known as Zero-G – have gained important new insights into the way metals solidify. Data from experiments installed on rockets that travelled some 260km above Earth helped develop a new method for assessing how solidification takes place – and that will allow for the production of stronger metal components. The global market for AM products and services in 2015 was £3.59bn and has grown at a rate of 31.5 per cent annually.
    Producer/AuthorEngineers Ireland
    URLhttps://www.engineersireland.ie/News/engineers-zero-g-space-research-shows-how-to-build-stronger-metal-components
    PersonsShaun Mc Fadden